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Currently filtering by tag: Acute kidney injury

Twitter Poll (September 12, 2019)

ANSWER: B In a case series by Boils et al. which included 49 patients with GN due to IE, the most common biopsy finding was necrotizing and crescentic GN which was found in 53% of the cases. This was followed by endocapillary proliferative GN in 37% of the biopsies. Reference: Boils CL, et al. Update on endocarditis-associated glomerulonephritis. Kidney Int. 2015; 87(6):1241-1249.  

Twitter Poll (August 7, 2019)

ANSWER: D The most common finding on kidney biopsies in patients with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICPIs)–induced AKI is acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. Less frequently, granulomatous interstitial nephritis and TMA have also been reported. The two main ICPIs are anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1). The onset of kidney injury seen with PD-1 inhibitors is usually late (3-10 months) compared to CTLA-4 antagonists-related renal injury, which happens earlier (2-3 months). PD-1 inhibitors, as opposed to CTLA-4 inhibitors, have been associated with kidney rejection in transplantation. Steroids appear to be effective in treating the immune-related adverse effects...

Type 1 Cryoglobulinemic Glomerulonephritis

The patient is a 75 year-old female who presents with proteinuria, a necrotic skin lesion on her lower extremity, and a creatinine of 5.5 mg/dL. Her serum complement levels (C3/C4) are low.  Serologies for ANA, dsDNA, rheumatoid factor, c-ANCA, p-ANCA, anti-GBM, and ASO are negative. Her cryoglobulins are positive. Image 1 shows hyaline thrombi and image 2 shows mild interstitial fibrosis. Images 3, 4, 5, and 6 are IgG, IgM, kappa, and lambda, respectively. This is a case of Type 1 cryoglobulinemia. Type 1 cryoglobulins are composed of a single monoclonal immunoglobulin that reversibly participates at low temperature (<37C).  Type...

Art of Medicine: Collapsing Glomerulopathy

Collapsing Glomerulopathy
The above painting shows a glomerulus with capillary tuft collapse, visceral epithelial cell hyperplasia, and numerous protein resorption droplets within Bowman’s space; findings that can be seen in collapsing glomerulopathy.  A PAS stain from a case of collapsing glomerulopathy is also shown in the photomicrograph below.  Initially, collapsing glomerulopathy was considered a severe form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and placed into the Columbia classification. According to the Columbia classification, collapse of at least one capillary loop with obliteration of the lumen and proliferation and hypertrophy of overlying podocytes is sufficient for a diagnosis of the collapsing glomerulopathy.  Tubulointerstitial damage is...

Diagnose This (July 1, 2019)

What is your diagnosis?       ​ ​   ​   ​ ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​ ​   ​ ​   ​ ​   ​ ​     ​   ​   ​ ​...

Diagnose This (June 24, 2019)

Immunofluorescence shows C3 (2-3+), IgM (1+), kappa (trace) and lambda (trace). What is your diagnosis?       ​ ​   ​   ​ ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​ ​   ​ ​   ​ ​...

Light Chain Cast Nephropathy

A 75-year-old female is found to have a creatinine of 4.0 mg/dL on a routine laboratory examination. At the hospital, a CT scan shows lytic lesions within the skull. A SPEP shows an IgG kappa monoclonal protein. A bone marrow biopsy shows 5% plasma cells. A kidney biopsy is requested to look for monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance. Figure 1 shows a normal glomerulus. Figure 2 shows severe interstitial fibrosis. Figures 3 & 4 show abnormal, PAS negative "stiffened" casts with cellular reaction and fracture. Figures 5 & 6 show kappa and lambda immunofluorescence, respectively. This is a case of...

Disease Week: C3 Glomerulonephritis

Monday Rediscovery of Complement Mesangial C3 deposition only within the glomerulus has been reported since 1980. Only recognized recently as a distinct entity when CFHR5 nephropathy was reported. CFHR5 mutation is speculated to represent a founder mutation which can be traced back to the Troodos mountains of Cyprus. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21566112   1 in 6500 people in Cyrus carry a mutation in CFHR5 (duplication of exons 2 and 3) and inheritance is autosomal dominant. C3 and C4 complement levels are normal. 80% of males with CFHR5 nephropathy progress to ESRD while only 20% of females progress to ESRD. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22065842 CFHR5 nephropathy is...

Art of Medicine: Lysozyme Nephropathy

Lysozyme Nephropathy, art of medicine
The painting above shows acute tubular injury with numerous intracytoplasmic inclusions within proximal tubular epithelium, which can be seen in lysozyme-associated nephropathy.  Lysozyme-induced nephropathy is a rare cause of acute tubular injury seen in patients with hematologic malignancies, most commonly with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and acute monocytic leukemia (Santoriello et al, 2017).   Malignancy associated overproduction of lysozyme can lead to acute kidney injury and proteinuria.  Lysozyme is freely filtered by the glomerulus and reabsorbed by the proximal tubular epithelium.  While this happens at a low level physiologically, over-reabsorption of lysozyme induces toxic acute tubular injury. Lysozyme-induced nephropathy is one...