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Currently filtering by tag: Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance

Type 1 Cryoglobulinemic Glomerulonephritis

The patient is a 75 year-old female who presents with proteinuria, a necrotic skin lesion on her lower extremity, and a creatinine of 5.5 mg/dL. Her serum complement levels (C3/C4) are low.  Serologies for ANA, dsDNA, rheumatoid factor, c-ANCA, p-ANCA, anti-GBM, and ASO are negative. Her cryoglobulins are positive. Image 1 shows hyaline thrombi and image 2 shows mild interstitial fibrosis. Images 3, 4, 5, and 6 are IgG, IgM, kappa, and lambda, respectively. This is a case of Type 1 cryoglobulinemia. Type 1 cryoglobulins are composed of a single monoclonal immunoglobulin that reversibly participates at low temperature (<37C).  Type...

Disease Week: Monoclonal Gammopathy of Renal Significance

Disease Week: Monoclonal Gammopathy of Renal Significance   Summary: Renal disease caused by parenchymal deposition of circulating monoclonal immunoglobulins (mIg) is a well established phenomenon. Light chain cast nephropathy, light chain deposition disease and AL amyloidosis are probably the best known entities; nevertheless, the list also includes a number of less common and recently described entities, some of which are still poorly understood.  These disorders may be seen in the setting of either a B-cell or plasma cell proliferative disorder with production of a mIg. When these proliferative disorders represent an overtly malignant disease (e.g. multiple myeloma, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, high-grade...

Light Chain Cast Nephropathy

A 75-year-old female is found to have a creatinine of 4.0 mg/dL on a routine laboratory examination. At the hospital, a CT scan shows lytic lesions within the skull. A SPEP shows an IgG kappa monoclonal protein. A bone marrow biopsy shows 5% plasma cells. A kidney biopsy is requested to look for monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance. Figure 1 shows a normal glomerulus. Figure 2 shows severe interstitial fibrosis. Figures 3 & 4 show abnormal, PAS negative "stiffened" casts with cellular reaction and fracture. Figures 5 & 6 show kappa and lambda immunofluorescence, respectively. This is a case of...

Art of Medicine: Fanconi Syndrome

This painting shows the transition between a proximal tubule and the thick descending limb of the loop of Henle.  The proximal tubule has numerous functions, including transport of sodium chloride, bicarbonate, glucose, amino acids, organic cations, organic anions, and phosphate.  Disruption of proximal tubule function manifests clinically as Fanconi syndrome.   Development of polyuria, osteomalacia, muscle weakness, and growth failure can result if it is unrecognized and untreated. Fanconi syndrome can be diagnosed by clinical chemistry tests, including urine sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphate, glucose, amino acids, and uric acid levels, as well as urine pH.   In Fanconi syndrome, there is glycosuria...

Diagnose This (April 1, 2019)

What is your diagnosis?         ​ ​   ​   ​ ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​ ​   ​ ​   ​ ​   ​ ​     ​   ​   ​...

Diagnose This (February 25, 2019)

What is your diagnosis?     ​ ​   ​   ​ ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​ ​   ​ ​   ​ ​   ​ ​     ​   ​   ​ ​  ...

AL Amyloidosis

A 70 year-old female presents with nephrotic range proteinuria and a creatinine of 1.2. She was in her normal level of health until about 6 months ago when she noticed foamy urine and swelling in her ankles. She has lost 30 lbs unintentionally during the last few months. Her cardiologist said that her proteinuria does not appear to be related to the heart. A kidney biopsy is performed. The glomerulus in figure 1 is distorted and has a “washed-out” or pale appearance on PAS stain. A silver stain shows material which is non-argyrophilic (figure 2). A Congo red stain shows...

Art of Medicine: Light Chain Proximal Tubulopathy

The painting above shows light chain proximal tubulopathy with crystals, which is one type of a monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS).  MGRS, as defined by the International Kidney and Monoclonal Gammopathy Research Group, is a “clonal proliferative disorder that produces a nephrotoxic monoclonal immunoglobulin” (Leung N et al, 2019), and indicates end-organ damage resulting from a monoclonal gammopathy.   The most common MGRS manifestations include AL amyloidosis, monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease, light chain cast nephropathy, and light chain proximal tubulopathy.   In light chain proximal tubulopathy, a nephrotoxic monoclonal light chain induces acute tubular injury or proximal tubular dysfunction.  Proximal tubular...

Twitter Poll (December 7, 2018)

ANSWER: D MGRS was introduced to acknowledge a clonal plasma cell or B lymphocyte proliferation causing a renal lesion in the absence of hematologic malignancy or other myeloma-defining events; the renal lesion is a consequence of the MIg, which carries major implications for management and prognosis, including the potential for progressive renal injury and ESRD. MGRS caused by PC is defined as <10% bone marrow plasma cells (BMPCs), <3 g/dl of M protein, and the presence of renal lesions without any other myeloma-defining events (CRAB features; clonal PC ≥60%; serum FLC ratio of ≥100; or >1 focal lesion on magnetic...

Diagnose This (November 12, 2018)

What is your diagnosis and what do you need to prove it?           ​ ​   ​   ​ ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​ ​   ​ ​   ​ ​  ...