arrow-right-realarrow-right-whitearrow-rightback-to-topdoctordownloadfacebookinstagramlogo-markerlogo-wordmarkpodcastsearchsearch_whitetwitter
Close Modal

Blog


Currently filtering by tag: APOL1

Art of Medicine: Collapsing Glomerulopathy

The above painting shows a glomerulus with capillary tuft collapse, visceral epithelial cell hyperplasia, and numerous protein resorption droplets within Bowman’s space; findings that can be seen in collapsing glomerulopathy.  A PAS stain from a case of collapsing glomerulopathy is also shown in the photomicrograph below.  Initially, collapsing glomerulopathy was considered a severe form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and placed into the Columbia classification. According to the Columbia classification, collapse of at least one capillary loop with obliteration of the lumen and proliferation and hypertrophy of overlying podocytes is sufficient for a diagnosis of the collapsing glomerulopathy.  Tubulointerstitial damage is...

Art of Medicine: Lupus Nephritis Genetics

The above painting shows an image of a sequencing gel, which are produced by DNA synthesis in the presence of sequence terminators such as dideoxyribonucleotides (that are mixed with deoxyribonucleotides used for chain elongation), with the DNA fragments run on an agarose gel. The agarose gels are then imaged using a DNA intercalator, such as ethidium bromide, that allows the DNA fragments to fluoresce in the ultraviolet spectrum. This is the basis of Sanger sequencing. Advances to Sanger sequencing included use of fluorescent labeled chain terminators, which allowed for a higher throughput readout and faster results. These could also be...

APOL1: Why Is It Important?

I have been working at Arkana Laboratories (formerly Nephropath) for close to seven years as the Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory Supervisor. One of my first projects here was to isolate DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and get an assay set up to determine variants in the APOL1 gene. At that time, these variants were recently discovered and there was great excitement in the scientific community as to their role in kidney disease, especially in African Americans, which is the population with the highest frequency of these gene variants in America. Our project involved the role of these variants in collapsing glomerulopathy...

Twitter Poll (April 17, 2019)

ANSWER: D Collapsing glomerulopathy has been associated with certain infectious disease including HIV, Hepatitis C, HTLV-1, parvovirus B19, cytomegalovirus, tuberculosis, Campylobacter enteritis, and Loa loa filariasis. References: Cossey LN, Larsen CP, Liapis H. Collapsing glomerulopathy: a 30-year perspective and single, large center experience. Clin Kidney J 2017; 10(4):443-449 Cohen AH, Nast CC. HIV-associated nephropathy. A unique combined glomerular, tubular, and interstitial lesion. Mod Pathol 1988; 1: 87–97 D’Agati V, Suh JI, Carbone L, et al. Pathology of HIV-associated nephropathy: a detailed morphologic and comparative study. Kidney Int 1989; 35: 1358–1370 Pakasa NM, Nseka NM, Nyimi LM. Secondary collapsing glomerulopathy associated...

Diagnose This! (January 22, 2018)

What is your diagnosis?     ​   ​ ​   ​   ​ ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​   ​ ​   ​ ​   ​ ​   ​ ​     ​   ​   ​...

Collapsing Glomerulopathy

Collapsing glomerulopathy is characterized by glomerular tuft collapse with overlying epithelial hypertrophy and hyperplasia in Bowman’s space. This pattern of glomerular injury is most commonly seen in African Americans and has been shown to be strongly associated with the presence of APOL1 risk variants in a number of associated diseases including HIV infection, lupus nephritis, interferon therapy, PLA2R-positive membranous glomerulopathy, and idiopathic cases.